SurvivalMedicineBlog

surviving without the doctor

Allergic Reactions and Anaphylactic Shock Emergencies

Addressing Post-SHFT Allergic Reactions

 

One of my greatest concerns even before a TEOTWAWKI event is an allergic reaction to bee or wasp stings. Myself and other members of my family have all had moderate to severe reactions to stings and while it would be nice to think that an EpiPen will be available, I am realistic. They are expensive, have an expiration date and require a prescription. I am all for having one ‘just in case’, but after moving out of the suburban rat trap a few years ago, I found myself living about 20 minutes from the nearest ER and the nearest rescue squad is about 10 miles from my home. I had to get educated about how to stop or slow down allergic reactions and quick since time is of the essence in an allergic reaction (including anaphylaxis). And besides that, you and I both need to know what to do just in case medical help is a long time coming or not all.

The following are JUST IN CASE measures! If you are experiencing a severe allergic reaction or anaphylactic shock and medical help is available…GET IT WITHOUT DELAY!

 

First thing first…what is an allergic reaction?

 

An allergy is an overreaction of the body’s own natural defense system that helps fight infections, the immune system. Normally the immune system protects the body from viruses and bacteria by producing antibodies to fight them. In an allergic reaction, the immune system starts fighting substances that are usually harmless (such as, pollen, a medicine, food substance or even venom) as though these substances were trying to attack the body by releasing histamines. When histamine is released, the body reacts with an allergic reaction. This overreaction can cause a rash, itchy eyes, a runny nose, trouble breathing, nausea, and diarrhea.

This over reaction of the immune system may not occur the first time you are exposed to an allergy-producing substance. For example, the first time you are stung by a bee, you may have only pain and redness from the sting. If you are stung again, you may have hives or trouble breathing. This is caused by the response of the immune system to the venom.

Allergic reactions can range from mild and annoying to sudden and life-threatening. Most allergic reactions are mild, and home treatment can relieve many of the symptoms. An allergic reaction is more serious when severe allergic reaction, anaphylaxis occurs, when the allergic reaction causes other problems or when home treatment doesn’t help.

 

Start at the beginning. Since an allergy is an immune system response, it would make sense to be sure that your immune system is strong and working properly. Eating correctly, getting enough sleep, stress reduction and mental attitude all play a roll in a healthy immune system. Granted, in a SHTF scenario all of these may go out the door, but until then, do what you can and when it does hit the fan, do what you can to maintain as best as you can.

Herbs that can help strengthen the immune system are varied and many grow right in your backyard or can easily be grown.

Echinacea Purpurea is the most well known of the immune system strengthening herbs. I recommend drinking as a tea (1 cup daily) or using the tincture form for one week out of four weeks for general use. Do not use continuously as it can over stimulate the immune system and be rendered useless.

Garlic and local Honey. Yes, garlic and local honey…they are both considered ‘tonics’ to the immune system and maybe used daily. For garlic, fresh is the best. Crush and eat one clove daily. For honey, 1 Tablespoon daily.

Astragalus is a time honored TCM tonic for the immune system which can be grown in many regions of theUnited States. Use either as a decoction (boiled, strong tea) or in tincture form daily for one month on, one month off.

Peppermint. Yes, peppermint. This can be made into a tea for daily use and is readily grown through out the world.

 

Next, the immune system is linked with the nervous system. A calm and healthy nervous system will go a long way towards reducing the severity of an allergic response. A few herbs that are excellent for the nervous system are Avena sativa (Oats), Scutellaria lateriflora (Scullcap) and Turnera diffusa (Damiana). All of these may be eaten, taken as a tea or tincture and used daily or as needed.

 

Also, keeping your liver healthy so that it can function correctly is important and goes a long way to strengthening your immune system too.

Herbs that help in maintaining a healthy liver are widely varied and include:

Milk Thistle, Dandelion Root and Leaf, Artichoke Leaves and Astragalus. Dandelion root and artichoke are easily cultivated here in theUnited Statesand both maybe eaten without cooking. Dandelion makes a wonderful tea too and can be used daily.

The above herbs can be used alone or together for prevention or mitigation of an allergic reaction.

 

Okay, now you are doing prevention and being as careful as possible to avoid the allergen, but somehow, you have an allergic reaction. I will assume for the rest of this writing that you know what ‘caused’ the allergic reaction.

 

First thing to remember is that TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE in an allergic reaction and to remain as calm as possible. Be prepared to react quickly upon first symptom of an allergic reaction, especially if you are prone to anaphylactic shock. If you have an EpiPen use it FIRST!

 

Bees and Wasps and Other Bites

 

The first line of defense that has worked very well for me and my family has been homeopathic remedies followed by essential oils and herbs.

 

The following are appropriate remedies for stings and bites:

 

Aconitum napellus: This remedy can be helpful if a person feels fearful or panicked after being stung or bit. Cutting, stabbing, or burning pain may be felt, along with swelling, tingling, or numbness. Aconitum should be used immediately, while symptoms are intense, and can be followed by another remedy, as indicated.

 

Apis mellifica: If a bite or bee sting causes puffy, tender swelling that is pink or red and hot to the touch, this remedy may be helpful. The area stings and burns, and cold applications bring relief. (If a person is allergic to insect venom, especially bee-stings, Apis may help to reduce the swelling of the passages, given as first aid while on the way to emergency medical care.)

 

Cantharis: This remedy may be indicated if a bite or sting results in intensely burning, scalding pain. The area of inflammation is red, and blisters may develop.

 

Carbolicum acidum: This remedy is usually indicated in first-aid situations, while medical help is being sought. The person feels sick and weak, and may have trouble breathing, with a dark or reddish face that looks pale around the mouth.

 

Hypericum: This remedy is known for its soothing effect on injuries to nerve-rich body areas. It is also useful after puncture wounds, including bites and stings. Shooting pains or pains with numbness and tingling often are experienced when Hypericum is needed.

 

Ledum palustre: Swelling that extends some distance from the bite, often with a bluish tinge, a feeling of cold and numbness, and aching pain, suggests the use of this remedy. If the swollen part seems cold, but the application of ice or cold water brings relief, Ledum is strongly indicated.

 

Urtica urens: Reddish blotches that burn and itch intensely (like a nettle sting) after insect bites may be relieved with this remedy. It is also a useful remedy for hives that sting and itch.

 

 

For those who are known to have anaphylactic response to stings and bites the three main remedies that are a MUST have in a SHTF situation are: Aconitum napellus, Apis mellifica and Carbolicum acidum.

 

Use the Aconitum FIRST followed immediately by the Carbolicum (if indicated) and Apis. Take 4 pellets of the Aconitum immediately. Then take 4 pellets of the other remedies (both if need be but definitely the Apis!). You use a homeopathic remedy (and a tincture for that matter) by putting the pellets under the tongue and allowing to melt. Do NOT chew or swallow. Allow the remedy to work. If you seek it working significantly, then do not dose again. If you begin to see ‘improvement’ slow or no improvement, take another dose. Do not hesitate to take another dose if you are unsure!

 

Take these remedies as needed until the symptoms subside and the threat has passed, then begin to take the other remedies mentioned above to address the other possible reactions. I will typically take a homeopathic dose and then when symptoms begin to resume take another dose. You will have to pay attention to the signs and symptoms in order to know when to dose…again, if in doubt, dose. But if the symptoms have clearly gone away, do not dose. Often times you will see a ‘reduction’ in symptoms and then a ‘rebound’. PAY ATTENTION. The MINUTE you see a return of symptoms take another dose.

 

 

Regarding homeopathic remedies…I personally keep on hand the 200c, 6c and 30c remedy for emergency situations of these remedies and it is suggested that you use either the 6c or 30c but use whatever strength you have on hand.

 

 

Food Allergies- There is no straight forward homeopathic remedy that I know of for a food allergy reaction. However, it is my understanding that the same remedies used in a first aid situation for bee stings would also help in this situation given the symptoms may be the same. It goes without saying to AVOID the offending food. Bromelain, which is found in Pineapple has been found to be beneficial in reducing allergic reactions to food.

 

Of note is one ‘herbal’ remedy for an allergic reaction to food. Peach Tincture. Kiva Rose, a well-known and respected master herbalist uses the tincture of Peach to halt allergic reactions to food. I have yet to find it already made for purchase but it is simple to make yourself ‘just in case’ and you don’t have to kill the tree to make it.

 

Directions for making Peach Tincture:

After spring pruning take the twigs or branches of the peach tree that you would normally compost or burn and grab a glass jar. Cut the branches or twigs into small 1 inch pieces and place in the glass jar (at least half full). Pour 100 proof alcohol over this filling to the top of the jar. Place the lid on top and tighten. Place the jar with the mixture in a cool, dark place for at least 6 weeks. Be sure to shake this mixture in the jar 2-3 times a week and then remove the plant material after 6 weeks. To use at the beginning of a food allergy reaction (mild to moderate) take 1 tsp. of the tincture and hold, swishing in the mouth for at least 1 minute before swallowing. Use as needed until symptoms are gone.

 

The aftermath. Nothing is worse that getting over an allergic reaction. The pain, swelling, itching can be horrible. This is due to the histamine reaction and there are ways to address this and speed up the process as your body clears its system of the allergen.

 

An antihistamine is used to fight off the body’s natural chemical histamine and should be used as soon as any threats to life have been addressed and if possible, used at the sametime. Antihistamine herbs fight off histamine and stop the allergic reaction from continuing.

 

 

Echinacea

Chamomile

Basil

Ginger

Stinging Nettle

Plantain

Reishi (a type of mushroom)

Wild Oregano

 

If you have a known allergy it may be well worth it to incorporate these herbs into your diet. Basil, ginger, and oregano can easily be incorporated into your diet and grown. Echinacea, chamomile, stinging nettle and plantain can also be grown or wild crafted. Echinacea, chamomile and stinging nettle can be taken as a tea or tincture as needed to fight off a histamine response. Plantain is often used directly on the site of the sting or bite to counteract the allergen.

In any case, 1 cup of tea as needed to control the histamine response. 60-100 drops of the tincture as needed OR if you have the herb in pill form (best for overnight use) take up to 6 capsules at one time.

Plantain can be found growing wild in waste areas. To use simply pick, chew and then place the chewed material directly on the site of the bite/sting to help reduce histamines.

 

You may also use Tea Tree or Lavender essential oil to help with the allergic reaction. Especially for stinging, swelling and pain. I have found that liberal use of Tea Tree essential oil (not diluted) on the affected area is most helpful for ‘hot’ skin and lavender essential oil is best for ‘cold’ skin…allow to dry and repeat as needed.

 

Natural ephedrine….just in case. While certainly nothing will replace the EpiPen there is one plant/shrub that contains natural ephedrine that can be grown here in theUSand is often found in the wild in the western areas of theUnited States. Mormon Tea. It might be worth a shot to have on hand ‘just in case’ to deliver a shot of ephedrine into your system. I know first hand its usefulness in bronchitis and in helping to control asthma symptoms. You would need to either have the tincture available for immediate use (use 1tsp, hold in mouth, swish around for 1 minute and then swallow) or the plant material to make a strong tea. If you use the tincture you cannot use a homeopathic for at least 20 minutes as the alcohol will destroy the homeopathic.

 

 

THESE ALL WORK! Both my husband and I have extremely bad reactions to bee and wasp stings and using these have allowed us to reduce the allergic response enough to treat at home. The key is having these on hand for IMMEDIATE USE! Homeopathic remedies do not go bad when stored correctly and having these on hand might just save your life or someone else’s while you either wait on the ambulance, get to the doctors office or even tough it out yourself. While anaphylactic shock is extremely serious I would personally rather try something than do nothing and if you don’t have this type of reaction you might just save yourself some pain and misery by using this information. Use your brain here, severe allergic reactions are no joke and if you can, I always recommend to get professional help if at all possible in life threatening situations.

God bless and good luck!

 

Rev. Laura

Advertisements

January 9, 2012 - Posted by | Guidelines, Herbs, Homeopathics, Medical Conditions | , , , , , , ,

5 Comments »

  1. whoah this blog is excellent i love reading your posts. Keep up the good work! You know, lots of people are hunting around for this information, you can help them greatly.

    Comment by Shinaej Hollyl | July 27, 2012 | Reply

  2. Anaphylaxis is a serious type of allergy that usually happens when a person takes a triggering substance that is often called allergen. The exposure and its resulting reaction, anaphylaxis, occurs when the person become sensitized to that substance.Sometimes even if the person is exposed to allergens, even how little the allergens are and the time of exposure, the resulting allergy can really be serious and life-threatening.Anaphylaxis attacks can happen after the substance is inhaled, injected or ingested. Physical or skin contact to the substance can sometimes also lead to anaphylaxis attacks.;

    Newest content straight from our personal web portal
    <http://www.healthmedicinelab.com/blood-clot-in-lung/

    Comment by Jolyn Felonia | February 10, 2013 | Reply

    • you are absolutely right…but there are many natural remedies that can stop it in its tracks which is my focus…thanks for sharing

      Comment by Rev. Laura | April 7, 2014 | Reply

  3. If an anaphylactic shock is occurring, do I take all three: Aconitum napellus, Apis mellifica and Carbolicum acidum? 30 years ago I had an anaphylactic shock reaction to a triple-sized “German yellow jacket” sting. Hand turned splotchy red & it became hard to breathe. After 20 minutes, it passed. Since then I have been stung by wasps and yellow jackets a few times, but no anaphylactic shock. What is dosage? Someone with some homeopathic knowledge said to use the Epi-Pen as a backup AFTER using the Apis; you disagree? Thanks.

    Comment by cb108 | April 7, 2014 | Reply

    • Hi…I can only tell you MY experience…I do NOT use an epi pen PERIOD. Can’t afford them, they go bad quickly and while I definitely acknowledge their purpose and life saving ability…the Acon Nap is for shock, calming down which is very important, when you know you have a life threatening problem you freak out…Apis Mel is for the actual reaction…use as needed as often as needed…tea tree oil is AWESOME at stopping the histamine reaction which causes the issue to begin with…..actually, what you describe is a one time issue :), epi pens should be had ‘just in case’ but as someone who is definitely going down, I have never used one, just tea tree oil and my homeopathics every 5 mins. The opinion is probably to CTA…cover their butt…
      but I have been there done that…stung over 50 times at once and I am still here without the epi and no doc 🙂
      key with essential oils and homeopathics is SPEED

      Comment by Rev. Laura | April 7, 2014 | Reply


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: